Thursday, July 14, 2011

February 11, 2007







  February 11, 2007, 2:30 p.m.  

 

Kristin Samuelson
soprano/pianist

 

Hsiao-Ling Wang
soprano/pianist

   featuring Richard Tompkins violin


  Art Songs and Arias


Kristin Samuelson

Soprano and pianist Kristin Samuelson
has appeared throughout Europe, Canada, and the United States in chamber music, opera, oratorio and recital, and has premiered numerous works, including Ned Rorem’s oratorio, Homer, singing the part of Helen of Troy, and John Carbon’s opera, Benjamin, appearing as Madame Brillon. Other opera appearances have included roles with the National Opera Company and Duke Festival in North Carolina, the Banff Festival in Canada, and St. Luke’s Opera in New Jersey. Additional career highlights include recital appearances at Lincoln Center, the American Academy in Rome, the Gardner Museum in Boston, Nantucket Chamber Music Festival and Federal Hall in New York, and she was artist-in-residence at the International Composers’ Conference in Leukerbad, Switzerland.


Hsiao-Ling Wang

Soprano and pianist
Hsiao-Ling Wang,
a native of Taipei, Taiwan, began studying piano at age five and received her formal music education at the University of Southern California.  She has appeared in a variety of opera productions, including leading roles in Cosi fan tutte, The Old Maid and The Thief, Merry Wives of Windsor, Hansel und Gretel, Madama Butterfly, and Die Fledermaus, and she recently joined Orlando Opera in their production of Salome, as the Sklava. Ms. Wang has been the featured soloist with symphonies and choral groups in Southern California, and is well known in central Florida for her numerous concert and recital appearances in the Orlando area. This Intermezzo concert marks her Jacksonville debut.
http://www.hsiao-ling-wang.com/
e-mail: baroque_pearl@yahoo.com

  • GRIEG: Three Norwegian Songs
  • SCHUMANN: Frauneliebe und Leben
  • MOZART: L'amerò, sarò costante
    from Il Re Pastore, featuring Richard Tompkins, violin
  • PUCCINI: Un bel di vedremo

    from Madama Butterfly
  • GOUNOD: Ah! je ris de me voir
    Marguerite's "Jewel Song" from Faust
  • VERDI: Vieni! t'affretta!,

    Lady Macbeth's cavatina from Macbeth
  • GERSHWIN: Summertime

    from
    Porgy and Bess
  • GERSHWIN: I Got Rhythm!

    from Girl Crazy


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Saturday, July 4, 2009

4/10/2008: Violin Futura--Trio, Duo, Solo

Jacksonville Public Library


Piotr Szewczyk, Max Huls & Andy Bruck perform exciting and innovative works for 1-3 violins!



VIOLIN FUTURA Trio-Duo-Solo




Piotr Szewczyk returns with an entirely different program from his original Violin Futura offerings given here in February. For this special performance Mr. Szewczyk will be joined by Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra colleagues Max Huls and Andy Bruck. This concert will feature the world premieres of several brand new pieces!



There will be a reception for the violinists and concertgoers following the recital.

MUSIC@MAIN concerts are free and open to the public, and reservations are not required.



Where:
Main Library
Hicks Auditorium (Conference Level)
303 North Laura Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202

PARKING @ the MAIN LIBRARY

PROGRAM SELECTIONS

This presentation of VIOLIN FUTURA will feature a new group of pieces, many performed for the first time!

Piotr Szewczyk - First Coast Groove (World Premiere)(solo) 3'
Joel Hoffman - Square One (solo) 7'
Michael Fiday - Dharma Pops (duo) 10'
Michael Fiday - Lament from Aphorisms (solo) 3'
Carson Cooman - Virelai (World Premiere)(solo) 2'
Carson Cooman - Estampie (World Premiere)(duo) 4'
William Schirmer - Lyric (World Premiere)(solo) 2'
Sydney Hodkinson - Remnant (World Premiere)(solo) 4'
Piotr Szewczyk - Conundrum II (trio) 11'

VIOLIN FUTURA is an ongoing venture conceived and realized by Piotr Szewczyk. The violinist explains, "I created the project because I wanted to expand the contemporary violin repertoire with pieces that are fun to play and to listen to, and they bring something new and unique to the repertoire." It began with a recital of 15 solo pieces written especially for Mr. Szewczyk by composers from around the globe which he has performed at various festivals and venues in the United States and Europe, including his February 2008 Music@Main concert. To hear MP3 recordings of the original 15 pieces featured in Violin Futura, please visit http://www.violinfutura.com/.





ABOUT THE PERFORMERS
Piotr SzewczykPolish-born violinist and composer Piotr Szewczyk (b. 1977) attended the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, earning both Bachelor and Master of Music degrees and his Artist Diploma, and serving as concertmaster of several of the Conservatory's orchestras. He recently completed a 3-year fellowship at the New World Symphony in Miami Beach, where he served as rotating concertmaster under Artistic Director Michael Tilson Thomas, and in September 2007 Piotr joined the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra.

The winner of the 2006 New World Symphony Concerto competition, Szewczyk has been described by the press as a “mature virtuoso” and a “gifted violinist with remarkable facility,” and his playing has been likened to that of the legendary Soviet violinist David Oistrakh by colleagues in the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra. He has appeared as soloist with numerous ensembles, and has given solo and chamber recitals in the United States, Poland, Germany and Austria.

Mr. Szewczyk has won a number of international awards for his compositions, and his works and have been performed by orchestral and chamber ensembles in Europe and the Americas. His award-winning string quartet Half-Diminished Scherzo was recently performed live on National Public Radio by the ALIAS Ensemble in Nashville.

For more information including a schedule of upcoming concerts by Piotr Szewczyk, please visit www.VeryNewMusic.com.
Max HulsViolinist Max Huls joined the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra in 1993 and was introduced to the First Coast as soloist in Bartók’s Second Rhapsody for violin and orchestra. He is a violin coach for the Jacksonville Symphony Youth Orchestra, and in addition to his core membership in the JSO he is Concertmaster of the Coastal Symphony of Georgia.

Mr. Huls appeared variously as concertmaster, soloist and conductor with the Savannah Symphony, and was concertmaster of the Memphis Symphony and Opera Memphis. Max was on the faculty of the University of Memphis and Rhodes College, and while living in Memphis was much sought after as a studio musician, working with the rock group The Replacements and soul legends Patti LaBelle and Al Green, among many others. He has participated in numerous music festivals, including the Aspen Music Festival, the Colorado Music Festival in Boulder, and the Eastern Music Festival.

Among his numerous local concerts and recitals, Max Huls has performed Paganini's demanding Twenty-four Caprices for Friday Musicale, and as a member of Duo Proto he plays violin and viola alongside his son, Victor Minke Huls. Mr. Huls frequently collaborates with award-winning pianist Christine Clark, and the Huls Clark Duo, who performed here in 2007, will return for the final Intermezzo Sunday Concert, on June 1, 2008.

Andrew BruckViolinist and composer Andrew Bruck has been a member of the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra since 1993. His solo performances with the JSO have included J.S. Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 (for violin, flute and harpsichord) and the "Autumn" Concerto from Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, and local recitals have featured his own original compositions.

Mr. Bruck and his wife, JSO violist Cynthia Kempf, met at the Yale School of Music while completing their master’s degrees, and their performance careers have since taken them throughout the country. The Avondale couple were artists-in-residence for over a decade at the Bay View Music Festival in northern Michigan, and as members of the Westbrook String Quartet they have enjoyed the mentorship of the Tokyo, Manhattan, Juilliard and Vermeer string quartets.

Prior to moving to Jacksonville Andy served as principal second violinist of the East Texas Symphony and as acting concertmaster of the Youngstown Symphony Orchestra. He has served on the executive board of the Jacksonville musicians’ union for several years, including as chair of the Jacksonville Symphony Players Association. An active champion of the arts, Mr. Bruck is a violin coach for the Jacksonville Symphony Youth Orchestra, and is on the summer faculty of Prelude Chamber Music Camp.

ABOUT THE COMPOSERS

Vancouver native Joel Hoffman (b.1953) is Professor of Composition at the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music and also remains an active pianist, appearing with the Chicago Symphony, the Belgian Radio and T.V. Orchestra, the Costa Rica National Symphony and the Florida Orchestra, among others. A selection of his honors include grants and awards from the American Academy-Institute of Arts and Letters, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Columbia University, and the American Music Center. His works, which draw inspiration from such diverse sources as Eastern European folk musics and bebop, receive frequent international performances. More at http://www.joelhoffman.net.

Michael Fiday (b.1961) is Assistant Professor of Composition at the College-Conservatory of Music at University of Cincinnati, and has been the recipient of numerous awards, grants and residencies from BMI, ASCAP, American Composers Forum, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, The MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Headlands Center for the Arts, and the Ohio Arts Council. His music has been commissioned and played extensively throughout the United States and Europe by performers as diverse as the Atlanta Symphony, the Percussion Ensemble of The Hague, pianist James Tocco, and electric guitarist Seth Josel. More at http://www.michaelfiday.com.

Touted by Music & Vision Magazine as "one of the most versatile and active musicians of our time," composer Carson Cooman (b.1982) has written over 700 works which range from instrumental solos to opera, and recordings of his compositions have been issued on a number of different labels. An active performer, Cooman specializes in presenting new music for organ, and over 120 works have been written for him by composer from around the world. More at http://www.carsoncooman.com.

William Louis Schirmer (b.1941) is professor of music theory and composition at Jacksonville University, and he must be ranked as one of history’s most prolific composers—his ever-growing catalog now numbers over 4,000 works in all genres, and includes at least 258 symphonies, 403 piano sonatas and 217 string quartets! He received his training at the Cleveland Institute of Music (BM), the Eastman School of Music (MM), and Ohio State University (PhD). More at http://www.ju.edu/departments/majors/music_schirmer.aspx.

Sydney Hodkinson (b.1934), who holds the Almand Chair of Composition at Stetson University in Deland, studied composition at the Eastman School of Music, Princeton University and the University of Michigan, and previously has taught at Universities in Ohio, Virginia and Michigan, as well as at Eastman. He has written over 250 works in a wide variety of genres, and has been awarded numerous grants and prizes from the Guggenheim and Ford foundations, the National Institute of Arts and Letters, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Canadian Council, and other prestigious organizations. His music is widely performed, and recordings have been issued on several labels. More at http://www.stetson.edu/music/faculty/hodkinson.php.


MUSIC @ MAIN

The music continues! Join us for our next mid-week concert!



Start Here. Go Anywhere.


Library: Main Library
Location: Hicks Auditorium


Contact: Ed Lein, Music Librarian
Contact Number: 630-2665
Presenter: Ed Lein, Music Librarian
Link: More information About VIOLIN FUTURA


9/9/2008: Alexei Romanenko, cello

Jacksonville Public library
MUSIC@MAIN
Tuesday, September 9, 2008
6:15 - 7:30 p.m.

Alexei Romanenko

20th century music for solo cello


This exciting program
will include the monumental
Sonata for Solo Cello, Op. 8 (1915)
by Zoltan Kodály


The times when music and musician and musical instrument combine to form an almost mystical union are rare. One such occasion came ... when Alexei Romanenko dazzled with his playing of Zoltan Kodaly's Sonata for solo cello.
-- Boston Herald, July 17, 2003

Where: Main Library
Hicks Auditorium (Conference Level)
303 North Laura Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202

ABOUT ALEXEI ROMANENKO

Alexei Romanenko, Principal Cellist with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, was born in Vladivostok, Russia. He came to the U.S. in 1998 on scholarship to study at the New England Conservatory of Music, and in the process he renewed old family ties to this country: his great-great-grandmother was an American Indian and his Granddad Pit, taken to Russia in 1914 at age 6, was born in Seattle. By the time Alexei was 12 he had won First Prize in the Far-Eastern Competition for Strings, and among his numerous subsequent awards are the Presser Music Award, First Prize at the 8th International Music Competition in Vienna, First Prize at the 2nd Web Concert Hall International Auditions, and the Montgomery Symphony Orchestra Cello Fellowship.

Mr. Romanenko performed as principal cellist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and has been featured on Boston’s WGBH radio's "Classical Performances" and in national and international broadcasts from Chicago and San Francisco. He has performed solo and chamber music concerts for "Janus 21" and Chameleon Arts Ensemble in Boston, as well as "BargeMusic" in New York City, Chappaquidick Music Festival, and Bar Harbor Music Festival, among others. Local performances include an appearance on TV Channel 25, and he frequently appears in chamber music concerts with many of the First Coast's finest musicians, including an April 2007 performance of Ravel's Trio in A minor with UNF professors Simon Shaio and Gary Smart for the Library's Intermezzo Sunday Concert Series. His solo recitals may include virtuostic original works, such as his Fantasia on a theme by Handel, and Romanenko also devises astounding arrangements, such as his solo cello adaptation of J.S. Bach’s "Chaconne" from Partita No.2, originally for solo violin.

Mr. Romanenko's distinguished solo career takes him to leading cultural centers and concert halls, including a gala performance in 2000 at the Berlin Brandenburg Gates under the direction of the late Maestro Mistislav Rostropovich. Recent appearances as soloist with various orchestras include performances of Tchaikovsky’s Rococo-Variations as well as cello concertos by Dvorák, Boccherini, Schumann, and Shostakovich, for which Alexei often composes his own cadenzas. Mr. Romanenko, who joined the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra during the 2005-2006 season, has taught at the San Francisco Institute of Music, Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama, and at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He now also serves as the organist/pianist at Grace Episcopal Church in Orange Park, Florida.



ABOUT THE COMPOSERS & MUSIC

Although his music is now much neglected, while he was alive Bavarian composer, conductor, educator and keyboard virtuoso Max Reger (1873-1916) was as highly regarded as Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler, and his influence was at least as great: Paul Hindemith credited his own stylistic development chiefly to Reger, and it has been observed that Reger’s post-Wagnerian chromatic excursions paved the way for the atonal sound-world of Arnold Schoenberg, who, incidentally, considered Reger to be a genius. Following the examples of Beethoven and Brahms, Reger fashioned his works in the tradition of "absolute" music, and his complete mastery of the fugue and other contrapuntal techniques demonstrates his devotion to the music of J.S. Bach. In the span of only about 25 years, Reger, whose works for organ are especially noteworthy, produced over 1000 pieces encompassing virtually every genre with the exception of opera.

Along with Stravinsky, Bartók and Schoenberg, German composer, violist, teacher, and music theorist Paul Hindemith (1895-1963) is often cited by musicologists as a central figure in music of the first half of the 20th Century, so it is perhaps surprising that performances of his works have become relatively rare. Although some of his first works approached the expressionistic atonality of early Schoenberg, Hindemith’s mature style, while still highly chromatic, is decidedly tonal. And although Hindemith frequently used formal procedures of the Baroque and Classical periods, his music is nonetheless removed from the "Neoclassical" movement centered around Stravinsky — whereas Stravinsky parodied earlier styles in an often ironic reaction against the perceived excesses of 19th-Century composers, Hindemith built on tradition as a continuation of the Teutonic musical heritage that runs from the Bach family through Haydn, Beethoven, Schumann, Brahms and Reger.

Jacques Ibert (1890-1962) was not a member of Les Six, but his best-known pieces evoke the same cosmopolitan sophistication and breeziness that one might expect from French composers of their generation. A student of Fauré at the Conservatoire de Paris, Ibert won the coveted Prix de Rome in 1919. In addition to composing, he became director of the French Academy in Rome in 1937, and in the mid-1950s he directed the Paris Opéra. Although he is perhaps most remembered for the orchestral works Escales ("Ports of Call," 1924) and Divertissement (1930), his catalog includes compositions in all genres, including film music and opera. The somber Ghirlarzana, the second of two pieces Ibert wrote for unaccompanied cello, reflects his more serious side.

Just as Khachaturian’s oeuvre is infused with the folk music of Armenia, so the works of Soviet cellist, educator and composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze (1925-1991) echo the folklore of his Georgian homeland, and for this he was recognized as People's Artist of Georgia in 1961. Tsintsadze, whose many other awards include People's Artist of the USSR (1987) and the USSR Stalin Prize (1950), wrote prolifically in all genres including scores for numerous films, but he is most highly regarded for his works featuring strings, and especially for his 11 string quartets.

P.D.Q. Bach (1807-1742?), the 21st of J.S. Bach’s 20 children, is the hilarious fictional creation of Professor Peter Schickele (b.1935), the composer and Grammy® Award-winning comedian who originated the character in the mid-1960s, about the same time that he left his teaching position at the Juilliard School. The salient feature of any "P.D.Q." work is the satirical blending of recognizable classical pieces and styles (which Schickele calls "manic plagiarism") with elements of present-day pop culture. His many memorable titles include The Short-tempered Clavier, Hansel and Gretel and Ted and Alice (An Opera in One Unnatural Act), and Fanfare for the Common Cold. Despite its poking fun, the Suite No. 2 is a demanding piece that requires four different kinds of pizzicato and the frequent changing of the cellist’s hand positions.

Hungarian composer and educator Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967) was a pioneering ethnomusicologist who worked closely with his friend Béla Bartók to collect and codify the folk music of Eastern Europe in the early part of the 20th Century. Kodály gained international fame with his 1923 oratorio Psalmus hungaricus, and the orchestral suite from his 1926 opera Háry János continues to hold its place in the world’s concert halls. The influence of Kodály’s immersion in Hungarian folksong is evident in his Sonata for Cello Solo, op. 8 (1915), one of the most demanding pieces written for the instrument, and one which requires scordatura re-tunings of the two lower strings.

--Notes by Ed Lein, Music Librarian




Start here. Go Anywhere.

ABOUT MUSIC@MAIN CONCERTS

Showcasing the talents of prominent First Coast musicians, MUSIC@MAIN concerts are open to the general public and reservations are not required. They are presented in the Main Library's Hicks Auditorium, located on the Conference Level of the Library near the Main Street entrances.

CONCERT PARKING

Library customers who use the public garage at the corner of Duval Street and Main Street may take their garage tickets to our ground-floor Popular Services Desk to get validation for free weekend and evening parking. Free on-street parking is also available on weekends and evenings.



Library: Main Library
Location: Hicks Auditorium
Contact: Ed Lein, Music Librarian

Contact Number: 630-2665
Presenter: Edward Lein, Music Librarian

6/1/2008 @ 2:30 p.m.: Huls Clark Duo

Jacksonville Public libraryINTERMEZZO Free Sunday Concerts
June 1, 2008 @ 2:30 p.m.

HULS CLARK DUO

Max Huls, violin
Christine Clark, piano


The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra violinist and award-winning pianist return to our stage for the INTERMEZZO Series Finale! Don't miss our last Sunday Concert!

Program Selections

  • Aaron Copland: Sonata (1943)
      (Andante semplice -- Lento -- Allegretto giusto)
  • Edward Lein: Sonatina (2007, World Premiere)
      Allegro moderato -- Nocturne -- Scherzo (Finale)
  • Rebecca Clarke: Midsummer Moon (1924)
  • Johannes Brahms: Sonata no. 3 in D minor, op. 108 (1888)
      (Allegro -- Adagio -- Un poco presto e con sentimento -- Presto agitato)

Where: Main Library
Hicks Auditorium (Conference Level)
303 North Laura Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202


ABOUT THE MUSICIANS

Violinist Max Huls joined the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra in 1993 and was introduced to the First Coast as soloist in Bartók’s Second Rhapsody, for violin and orchestra. Mr. Huls is a violin coach for the Jacksonville Symphony Youth Orchestra, and in addition to his core membership in the JSO he is Concertmaster of the Coastal Symphony of Georgia. He appeared variously as concertmaster, soloist and conductor with the Savannah Symphony, and was concertmaster of the Memphis Symphony and Opera Memphis. Max was on the faculty of the University of Memphis and Rhodes College, and while living in Tennessee was much sought after as a studio musician, working with the rock group The Replacements and soul legends Patti LaBelle and Al Green, among many others. He has participated in numerous music festivals, including the Aspen Music Festival, the Colorado Music Festival in Boulder, and the Eastern Music Festival. Among his numerous local concerts and recitals, Max has performed Paganini's demanding Twenty-four Caprices for Friday Musicale, and as a member of Duo Proto he plays violin and viola alongside his son, Victor Minke Huls. Mr. Huls frequently collaborates with award-winning pianist Christine Clark, and the Huls Clark Duo was featured in our June 2007 Intermezzo concert.



A native of Jacksonville, Florida, Christine Armington Clark began piano studies with James Crosland, and continued her professional training at Oberlin Conservatory. She received a Master's degree in piano performance from the University of Illinois, and studied with Leon Fleisher in the Peabody Conservatory Artist Diploma Program upon the recommendation of legendary concert pianist Lorin Hollander. Ms. Clark was national finalist in the Collegiate Artist Competition sponsored by the Music Teachers National Association, and attended the Aspen Music Festival on a piano performance and accompanying scholarship. She competed in the Maryland International Piano Competition, and won the Boca Raton Piano Competition. A versatile musician, Ms. Clark played keyboard with Trap Door, a local rock group, and toured Europe under the aegis of Proclaim! International. She taught piano at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, New Jersey, and her chamber music performances include an appearance at the Goethe Institute in San Francisco. Well known along the First Coast, Ms. Clark has appeared with the Jacksonville Starlight Symphonette and the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra. She is a frequent performer at Andy Clarke's Wednesday Happenings at Riverside Presbyterian Church, as well as at the Friday Musicale, and in 1999 she gave an all-Liszt recital for the St. Cecilia Music Society. In addition to being an accomplished pianist, Christine A. Clark is an attorney with the Jacksonville law firm of Pajcic & Pajcic, P.A., and while working as a law clerk in Washington, D.C., she gave perhaps her most unusual recital, performing in the United States Supreme Court at the request of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.



ABOUT THE COMPOSERS & MUSIC

Aaron Copland (1900-1990) is often called the “Dean of American Music,” and his most characteristic style, which blossomed during the 1930s and 40s, typically combines folk-like tunes with irregular, often jazzy rhythms and spacious harmonies creating a distinctly American sound. Along with Gershwin, Barber and Bernstein, the 1949 Oscar®-winning composer (for The Heiress) remains among the most-frequently performed and recorded American composers—his Fanfare for the Common Man (1942) is recognized even by those who don’t know the composer’s name, and his ever-popular ballet Appalachian Spring (1944) won him the Pulitzer Prize. Composed between these two concert staples, his wartime Violin Sonata (1943), written in memory of a friend who died in the South Pacific, displays both the jauntiness and pensive melancholy of Copland’s best-known works but also demonstrates elements of his less populist, more intellectual style in its sophisticated harmonic language and unpredictable formal elements.

Edward Lein (b.1955) is the Music Librarian for the City of Jacksonville and holds Master's degrees in Music Theory and Library Science from Florida State University. As a tenor soloist (now retired) he has appeared in recitals, oratorios and dramatic works throughout his home state, and drawing on his performance experience the majority of his compositions have been vocal works. He endeavors to imbue his instrumental pieces with a similar singing lyricism and typically avoids the intentionally artificial techniques of the Modernism that dominated the "serious" music of his youth, instead favoring a more spontaneous approach. Recent performances of orchestral works, including Meditation for cello, oboe and orchestra (premiered by the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra in June 2006) and In the Bleak Midwinter (premiered by the Jacksonville Symphony Players in December 2007), have demonstrated this aesthetic. The Sonatina for Violin and Piano was composed in 2007, and, as the title suggests, its direct, neoclassical style incorporates familiar formal patterns. The first movement adopts the precepts of sonata form, and the Nocturne presents a languid tune that alternates with a hymn-like chorale. The final Scherzo is an incisive transformation of the second movement theme, and its “trio” section further transforms the tune into a rather mundane parlor waltz which gains character as it progresses. Composed at the suggestion of Max Huls, this light-hearted Sonatina was written specifically with the Huls Clark Duo in mind, and more talented collaborators could not be hoped for by any composer.

Although her music has suffered unjust neglect, Rebecca Clarke (1886-1979) is cited as one of the most important British-born composers active between the World Wars, and she is the only female composer who enjoyed the patronage of Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, the American heiress who funded the Coolidge Auditorium in the Library of Congress and also started the annual Berkshire Music Festival in Massachusetts. Clarke started out as a professional violist, and she is highly regarded for her chamber music featuring strings, especially her 1924 Viola Sonata. Composed the same year, her luminous impressionistic tone poem Midsummer Moon is dedicated to the Hungarian violinist Adila Fachiri (née d'Aranyi) who premiered the work in London, and who is also the dedicatee of both of Béla Bartók's sonatas for violin and piano. In her youth Clarke performed with the famous Fachiri in various concerts in England, and she composed much of her chamber music for their all-female ensemble. Less than half of Clarke's works were published during her lifetime, but her estate, with the encouragement of the Rebecca Clarke Society founded in 2000, is working to make more of her compositions available and better known.

At a time when it was fashionable to write programmatic music that illustrates specific scenes, poems or stories, the great German composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) was recognized by his admirers as “Beethoven’s true heir” (Grove Concise Dictionary of Music) by demonstrating that established abstract formal procedures could still be used to organize musical discourse without sacrificing the passion and deeply individualistic expression that defines music of the Romantic period. Contrasting with his lyrical first two violin sonatas, Brahms’s Sonata No. 3 (1886-88) has four movements rather than three and assumes an almost symphonic scale. The choice of D minor as the central key harkens back to the stormy world of Brahms’s youthful Piano Concerto no. 1, op. 15 (1859), especially in the tarantella-like final movement, and the demanding piano part often resembles a concerto—there is no question that both instruments are meant to share the spotlight. As was very often the case for his works with piano, Brahms played the piano part himself for the premiere, so it is evident that in addition to being one of our most enduring composers he was also a highly gifted performer.

--Notes by Ed Lein, Music Librarian



Start here. Go Anywhere.

Our Sunday concert series is ending ... Don't miss the final Intermezzo concert!

ABOUT THE INTERMEZZO SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES

Showcasing the talents of prominent First Coast musicians, Intermezzo Free Sunday Concerts are open to the general public and reservations are not required. The monthly concerts, which began in March 2006 and will conclude in June 2008 with this concert, have been the best-attended series of adult programs in the history of Jacksonville Public Library -- you won't want to miss our final concert!

Intermezzo concerts begin at 2:30 p.m. and are presented in the Main Library's Hicks Auditorium, located on the Conference Level of the Library near the Main Street entrances. Post-concert receptions encourage audience members to meet and mingle with the artists.

CONCERT PARKING

Library customers who use the public garage at the corner of Duval Street and Main Street may take their garage tickets to our ground-floor Popular Services Desk to get validation for free Sunday and evening parking. Free on-street parking is also available on weekends and evenings.

MUSIC @ MAIN

The music continues! Join us for our next mid-week concert!





Library: Main Library

Location: Hicks Auditorium


Contact: Ed Lein, Music Librarian


Contact Number: 630-2665


Presenter: Ed Lein, Music Librarian

Tuesday, November 4, 2008

This blog has moved...


For current information on Music @ Main programs please visit jplmusic.blogspot.com